Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /home/rotation/public_html/wp-content/plugins/hybrid-composer/index.php on line 906

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/rotation/public_html/wp-content/plugins/hybrid-composer/index.php:906) in /home/rotation/public_html/wp-content/plugins/sg-cachepress/core/Supercacher/Supercacher_Helper.php on line 77
CLINICAL ROTATIONS: ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW – Rotation Placement

CLINICAL ROTATIONS: ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW


Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /home/rotation/public_html/wp-content/themes/landkit/functions.php on line 218

What are rotations?

Students of Medical Institutions are always expected to do no less than 24 clinical rotations in their third and fourth years of study at the Medical School. A single rotation lasts for four weeks (a month) which is grouped into two – core and elective rotation. Core rotations include internal medicine, surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, emergency medicine, ambulatory medicine, and psychiatry. Electives can be in any field and at any local medical facility. Rural medicine and family practice are other rotations that are similar to electives. Note that core rotations are compulsory while the elective ones are those you can choose from. Most of the teaching done during your clinical rotations are done by residents. This doesn't mean you won't have contact with attending physicians – you certainly will.


What is the purpose of clinical rotations?

During your first two years in the medical school, you receive classroom lectures which are primarily theoretical. For you to be an excelling physician, you must get into the hospital, interact with patients, learn the practical aspects of treatment, and interact with other healthcare staff such as the residents and nurses. This is what a clinical rotation offers. It gives you a chance to actually treat patients and interact with them. You're brought face-to-face with patients, and you learn the basics of each area of medicine. In fact, it is during your rotation that you'll decide which field of medicine to specialize in.

Assignment to clinical rotation groups

In most Medical Institutions, the class splits into 13 clinical rotation groups with all groups being the same size (same number of participants). Assignment into clinical rotation groups takes place in the second year. Upon grouping, each class chooses a sequence (1-13) that has been assigned a schedule of its forthcoming rotation (in the third and fourth year). What should be noted is that each class chooses its sequence (group rotation number) and group composition.

Changing the rotation sequence

Once you have made your selection in your second year, and it has been finalized, it is not possible to revert. You are required to complete the rotation within the specified period (third and fourth year).


Can I chose where I do my rotations?

Yes! Most medical schools give their students a master list of year-long sites where they can select core and elective rotations for their third and fourth years. This list is offered once a year though. The choice list is usually more than the number of students in a particular rotation group. This list is compiled annually and consists of physicians, hospitals, clinics and medical centers that are affiliated to the medical institution. These affiliates have an agreement with the Institution to train a specific number of interns on an annual or monthly rotational basis.


Is it possible to change your rotation site during your third and fourth year?

You cannot change your rotation site once you have been cleared by your institution. However, in the course of the rotation, students are allowed to swap rotations within groups. The rotation site, however, remains permanent until the duration of rotation is completed.


How is information concerning clinical rotation disseminated?

The dean of clinical education for each institution usually gives out the necessary information on clinical rotations during the first year of study. In the second year, a more detailed outline will be given out at arranged meetings. Institutions with a clerkship manual also present the information in the manual. The clerkship manual contains necessary and accurate information on aspects of clinical education such as the aims and objectives of the rotation, the curriculum, rules, regulations, grading, and student protocol among others.


There's a clinic around where I stay that has indicated interest to offer student rotations. Can I do mine there?

Students can only carry out clinical rotations in facilities that have been approved by the institution. If a facility is willing to offer rotation services, they must also be willing to do the same for all students who may want to do the rotation in that particular field provided by the facility. Most times, it takes years for the facility to meet the requirements of the institution before they can be certified to do the rotation. After approval, the facility will be required to sign the affiliate agreement with the institution.


How do I excel in my clinical rotation program?

You need to be committed and put in extra effort. Specific tasks are usually assigned to medical students, and you may even ask for extra hours and assignments. Remember, you will be taught by residents, and they typically work long hours. If you volunteer to help out, you may score more points as you help them ease their workload.

Always be prepared. You won't have much contact with the patients the way residents do. So you'll have all the time to prepare, looking at your patient's medical histories, reviewing their lab test results, and studying physician notes.

Never complain as a med student, even if you make mistakes and get blistered for it. There's no need to complain about it. The rotation is just for a short period. You could speak up if the situation is not appropriate, but for the most part, it becomes a gamble. Also understand that as a medical student, you are at the lowest level of the ladder in clinical practice, so humility is a must.

Participate in clinical exams and diagnostics with enthusiasm. Always be at the front and center and assist in procedures by learning from every experience.
Exhibit an air of professionalism in every sense. The medical profession is one of the noblest ones. Your attire should be professional, just like your conduct in the clinic. Ensure your lab coat is clean all the time. Avoid distractions during rotations such as looking at your phone during clinical hours (unless it's work related).
Show respect to everyone – residents, laboratory technicians, cleaners, nurses, patients, and family members. Lessons can come in many forms, so make sure to be open to learning in every way possible.


What do I do if I make a mistake?

One thing you should know is that no one is immune to mistakes. You will always make them. But there's no need to freak out. It is part of the learning experience, and your resident will correct you. Be patient because learning is a process. Medical students are not encyclopedias, and you are not expected to know everything from day one. Try not to take things personally and even when you feel stressed, always remember that rotations last just for a brief period.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One thing you should know is that no one is immune to mistakes. You will always make them. But there's no need to freak out. It is part of the learning experience, and your resident will correct you. Be patient because learning is a process. Medical students are not encyclopedias, and you are not expected to know everything from day one. Try not to take things personally and even when you feel stressed, always remember that rotations last just for a brief period.